Sunday, May 24, 2020

Critical Incidents Of Academic Institutions - 870 Words

Critical Incidents in Academic Institutions The critical incident technique is used to gather and analyze an employees behavior through methods such as observation and interviews (Andersson Nilsson,1964). This technique is useful in collecting information regarding behavior that amounts to successful or unsuccessful in a performance (Peterson, Jeanneret, 2007). The procedures utilized in the critical incident technique allows for the similarities, differences and patterns of behaviors to be analyzed. This process aids in the solving of problems, and establishing principles (Hughes, Williamson, Lloyd, 2007; Flanagan, 1954). According to Shapira-Lishchinsky (2010), utilizing critical incident reports in schools assist in enabling the management of errors, support and autonomy, which in turn reduces ethical friction. In regard to the school setting, critical incidents include minor incidents that occur daily in schools. Because of the nature of the job, middle school teachers can fa ce critical incidents that involve both moral and ethical conflict (Shapira-Lishchinsky, 2010). However, the classification or weather it is negative or positive is based on the meaning given by a teacher, observer, etc. Nonetheless, critical incidents and behaviors are important to identify as it can be detrimental to a teachers professional career (Shapira-Lishchinsky, 2010). One example of a positive critical incident for the middle school teacher is teachers who behavior demonstratesShow MoreRelated Student Privacy vs Student Safety1589 Words   |  7 Pagesnotify the police when a violent disturbance occurs? One would assume that when there is an assault or threat upon a student, the police would be the first people to be notified. When there is violence, or threats of violence against students in an academic setting, information about the threats and the troublesome student should be shared with the police. But Universities usually do not provide this information to the poli ce. Lynn Daggett, a Professor at the Gonzaga University School of Law, statesRead MoreBackground. Currently, There Doesn’T Seem To Be A Good1650 Words   |  7 Pagesa good method for collecting, maintaining, and correlating cyber-incidents. As US-CERT provides the standard vulnerabilities database, does other entities offer databases for cyber-incidents? This topic will examine available data on the Internet and how academia could combine various repositories to build and maintain such an environment. Therefore, will be investigating and mapping incident repositories availability for academic cyber security research. Also, determine the challenges, benefitsRead MoreSchool Profile : Everglades University1014 Words   |  5 PagesIn fact, Everglades University was one of the first higher learning institutions to offer an accredited Bachelor of Science degree in alternative medicine. Everglades University’s mission is to provide a quality education experience to adult student by creating an academically collaborative environment that promotes personal growth. This is accomplished through offering innovative programs, small class sizes and rigorous academic values. Everglades University’s goal is noted for its commitmentRead MoreEssay On Formal Business Continuity Planning767 Words   |  4 Pagescrisis, Several studies have also been done in Kenya. For instance Gathuku (2010) studied the response of microfinance institutions to the regulatory environment. Besides the fact that the study focused on a different problem, the context was generalized for all MFIs and not the deposit taking ones. Macharia (2011) studied the overall sustainability of microfinance institutions in Kenya. Her study was, however, focused on the presence or lack thereof of sufficient business opportunities for the MFIsRead MoreCyber Criminals, Thieves, And Terrorism1628 Words   |  7 Pagesago, cyberspace has given institutions such as hospitals the tools to accumulate and file as much information and data as possible in this great space of technology, networks, and systems. Information such as patient’s information, treatments, machinery, as well as having a better way to have a secure place to store them and have authorization in accessing them. However, such tools had been used as weapons by those w ho want to have access and possession of such critical information and control byRead MorePersuasive Essay On Bullying In Schools1428 Words   |  6 Pagesothers while those being bullied are powerless in their defense. As a result, bullying in the school undermines positive relationships among students as well as academic performances. From this perspective, understanding the causes and reasons for bullying is critical in the implementation of coping mechanism targeting improved academic performance and health How do people develop bullying behaviors? Bullying is a deviant behavior characterized by aggressive and violent behaviors at school, workplaceRead MoreCycle Of Socialization Essay710 Words   |  3 Pagesthe â€Å"real world† reinforced the initial concepts I absorbed during First Socialization. Through key institutions such as school, media, government, and the legal system, I have been influenced to understand the centrality of race in nearly every societal sphere, as well as the stereotypes, privileges, and oppressions associated with each side of my racial identity. What are some critical incidents or influences that have affected your story? Identify three examples from your testimonial to answerRead MoreNursing Case Study1250 Words   |  5 Pageswhat I had completed was a development of work contributing to the unjust academic standing... In formality franklin d -- refused entry illness were ignored or deferred. Cost of education or work status rendered unreasonable leading to further delays. for this reason a debt from work and income totaling seventy-eight dollars eighty one full layoff benefits during the affair. something eqauling the initial medical values in damages this should be given without discrimination. The foundation characterizedRead MoreBullying And Its Impact On Bullying973 Words   |  4 Pagesbullying research in the field of school psychology. This is shown by the exclusive focus on the student’s sexting photo and not on the later acts of bullying and their psychological implications in an environment populated by young people at a critical stage of cognitive and social development. Although the federal trial court dismissed the parent’s lawsuit based on â€Å"the school not being in a custodial relationship with the student at the time of the suicide,† this ruling represents a superficial

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Chalice Chapter 6 Free Essays

string(78) " in wild country over a rough rocky bed†¦the movement of his life force\." â€Å"Welcome,† she said again, still feeling dizzy and confused, but realising she meant it. He was welcome. â€Å"May I offer you – † She stopped. We will write a custom essay sample on Chalice Chapter 6 or any similar topic only for you Order Now She had no idea what a Chalice was supposed to offer a Master who visited her at her home. There must be a tradition, a right thing, even perhaps a rule. But it was not an eventuality it had occurred to her she needed to prepare for. And perhaps there was no rule after all, because the Chalice should have lived at the House, at the House with the Master. â€Å"Honey,† he said. â€Å"Will you offer me honey?† â€Å"Of course,† she said, still wit-scattered. â€Å"Anything – anything I can offer you.† â€Å"Honey, please,† he said politely, as if he were anyone – as if he were one of her customers. She looked at him bemusedly. Which honey? Not the sleepy. The energetic? One of the ache-soothers? Which one? One of the ones she hadn’t figured out yet (maybe they were just to make dull bread or porridge taste wonderful)? â€Å"Of course,† she said, and went indoors, as much to hide her confusion from him – but what did he see with his uncanny eyes? – as to fetch the honey. She went to the shelf where she kept the jars in use, and put her hand out blindly, choosing by not choosing: and so her hand reached itself, and took down a jar. It was one of the mysterious ones: she knew neither what it was for nor what it was made of. It was an early-summer honey, and she could taste the yellow singers and the wild cherry, but there was something else in it as well. Perhaps it’s a confusion-tamer, she thought, and the choice is really for me. She took two spoons, which is what she would normally do for a friend – or had done when she had had friends. But it was only as she picked up the second spoon that it occurred to her that this honey was also her secret favourite, and that she liked not knowing what was in it, and had silly fantasies about what it might be for, besides making dull bread or porridge taste wonderful. Would a Master eat honey straight out of the jar? She dithered a moment longer, and then made up a tray, with a half loaf of bread and a knife, and two cups, and a pitcher of water drawn that morning from the cottage well – whose water now had the faintest sweet taste, as if a little honey were leaking into its source. He was sitting in one of the stone chairs when she came back outside again. She had noticed before that he rarely stood for long; she wondered if the Hardbutt family furniture was to him any improvement on standing, but he looked, she thought, almost relaxed. More relaxed, anyway, than he had ever been during all the gatherings she had stood Chalice to. She paused in her doorway to look at him a moment longer. Even when there was not the slightest breeze the hem of his cloak stirred faintly, as if in response to some intangible air. Or flame. As she watched he raised his hands and put his hood back, tipping his face up to the sun and closing his disturbing red eyes. She’d never seen him bare-headed before and in the strong sunlight she had confirmed what she had suspected since the first time she saw him at the front door of the House, when she had given him the cup of welcome: there was a peculiar, somehow indefinite quality to his features that was not only to do with blackness seen in shadow. The lines of his face seemed strangely mutable, as if they flickered, almost like flames. But she also saw that he had hair: black and straight, pulled back from his face, and tied at the nape of his neck with something she could not see, lost in the folds of the hood. The boy who had smiled at her and her mother as he trotted past on his pony had had curly brown hair. But many straight-haired people had curly hair as children. She had to kneel to move some books out of the way before she set the tray down on the wide low stone that served as an outdoor table. He opened his eyes again and looked at her. She risked looking at him for longer than a glance. She could not discern pupil from iris – if perhaps a third-level priest of Fire still has ordinary irises and pupils – which were as lightlessly black as his skin. What should have been the whites of his eyes were red – red as fire – red as the embers that will set flaming anything that touches them. Reddened eyes in ordinary humans look sore and sick; his looked uncanny and fathomlessly deep. What might he see with such eyes? As she had done the morning he healed her hand, she heard herself asking a question she had no intention of saying out loud: â€Å"Do you see differently?† â€Å"With my red eyes?† he said, equably enough, and blinked. His eyelids stayed closed a fraction longer than a usual blink, and when they opened again that sense of burning embers was even stronger, in a face that seemed itself to flicker slightly, like a hot fire burnt low. â€Å"I’m not sure. It’s a gradual process, being taken by Fire. I still see the leaves of the trees as green, and a cloudless sky as blue. But I see heat, in a way I remember I did not, when I†¦before I entered Fire.† â€Å"You see heat,† she said, not understanding. â€Å"You are warmer than the surrounding air,† he said. â€Å"I see – or read – that. I read Ponty as a warm space too. A warm solid space – a Ponty-shaped space. His heat outlines him, and inside†¦within that outline there is movement, swirls, billows, like a stream in wild country over a rough rocky bed†¦the movement of his life force. You read "Chalice Chapter 6" in category "Essay examples" It moves clearly and strongly in him, like clear water. It is rarely so strong or so clear in humans. There is a rabbit in the brush over there; I see the curled and curling shape of its warmth, its body, behind the leaves, which screen it, I think, from your sight.† He looked around. â€Å"You can probably pick out the singing birds in your trees by tracing the sound; I can see the silent ones. I can see the ones invisible on their nests, and I can see how many eggs they sit on, for this late brooding. I can see where there is no life inside a sh ell, that it will not hatch.† â€Å"And the bees?† she said, fascinated. â€Å"Yes. The bees are tiny golden sparks, as of fire.† â€Å"Of honey.† â€Å"Yes. Of honey. The hives glitter with the movement of the bees.† â€Å"I wish I could see them like that,† she said wistfully. â€Å"It must be very beautiful.† He made no answer and – again as she had done that morning before he had first asked her to stand by him – she suddenly recalled to whom she spoke, and looked at him quickly, her mouth already open to apologise. But he was looking at her with what seemed to her was surprise. Her mouth stayed open, but no words came out. â€Å"It is very beautiful,† he said. She looked down, at her tray, at the little lopsided jar of glittering honey. â€Å"I don’t know much – I don’t know as much as I should – about Chalices,† he said. â€Å"Isn’t their usual susceptibility to water?† â€Å"Or wine,† she said. â€Å"Occasionally beer or cider or perry. Perhaps once every other century a woman who is pregnant or nursing when the Chalice comes to her finds that she holds her Chalice in milk, but that is not considered lucky for the demesne. Occasionally in a demesne near the sea it has been brine. I’ve read about the finding and naming of many Chalices now and I’ve not read of another one whose gift was honey. Never honey. I suppose that’s one of the reasons that it never occurred to me what was happening, in the beginning, after†¦Ã¢â‚¬  She knew she was talking too much, but it seemed to pour out of her, like honey from a jar: it wasn’t only the overwhelmingness of her life that made it lonely; it was that she had no one to share with how enormously interesting it also was. â€Å"And the coming is not usually so†¦melodramatic. That will have been the unsettled state of the demesne, I know, but†¦. You do get thing s like wells overflowing, but it was mead and honey everywhere here, and my goats were fountaining milk, and usually it’s not quite so†¦You know the Lady of the Ladywell was our first Chalice – that was her house well originally – her well overflowed, but all that happened, according to the records, is that it was the herald of a drought ending, and so very welcome. â€Å"This demesne has usually had water Chalices – maybe because of the willows. The last Chalice, the one who – who died† – she glanced up at him briefly and away again – â€Å"she was a water Chalice. I think that may be part of why†¦and part of why I†¦Ã¢â‚¬  She had babbled on too much already, but she did not want to stop there. â€Å"There’s a very old story about a blood Chalice. She must have had a horrible time. But she brought her demesne through a series of wars that destroyed the demesnes around her, according to the story, so maybe it was worth it to her. I’ve never found any record of her, though, only the story. In the story her demesne is called Springleafturn, and there isn’t one.† â€Å"‘Part of why,'† he said. â€Å"Part of why she and my brother died?† â€Å"I don’t know,† she said. â€Å"I should not have mentioned it.† â€Å"You have the right to know how your predecessor died.† â€Å"I have the right to have been apprenticed to the Chalice I was to succeed! I have the right to have known I was her heir! You have the right to have lived here and supported your brother as Master and learnt what you needed to know as his acknowledged Heir! Our land has the right to be cared for by a Master and a Chalice who know what they’re doing and – and are able to do it!† â€Å"And Willowlands is in trouble because these rights were not honoured.† â€Å"Yes,† she said wearily. â€Å"Yes.† She did not say, And it is why two – lame, faulty, unfit, what do you call a priest of Fire exiled from his Fire? What do you call a small woodskeeper suddenly ordered to be great? – unsuitable, unready people were made Chalice and Master, and why they cannot make a damaged land whole. It is all wrong; and the frame, the pattern, the yoke that holds us all, is not yet broken, but it is breaking. â€Å"Tell me why you said what you did. That being a water Chalice was part of why they died.† She was silent a moment. At last she said, â€Å"They died of fire and wine. I – I guess – and it is only a guess – she might have shaped the way better if she had had more strength for wine. Willowlands has always been very – † She tried to think of an adjective that would fit. The only ones that came to her were â€Å"pure† or â€Å"clean† or â€Å"clear† or â€Å"simple† and she could not say any of them to the brother of the man who had made it not so. There were other demesnes whose strength was not in clarity or purity, but she did not know how to make her own another of them, even to heal it. She thought, If the land chose me, then it cannot want to go that way. The only thing I have to offer is simplicity – dumb, harassed simplicity. â€Å"He was holding one of his – parties – I guess. Yes, he had begun them before he sent me away; indeed it was because of them that he did send me away, because I could, or would, not keep silence about them. No, no one has told me this, but it was the old pavilion that burnt, and it was there I know he held his first assemblies, because it suited his purposes. How can a Master and his Chalice be so insensible as to be overcome by fire, in their own demesne, unless they are drunk – or drugged?† Quickly she said, â€Å"At least we did not lose the House.† â€Å"The House would not have borne such usage as his carouses were,† he responded just as quickly. â€Å"He had to hold them elsewhere. I am sorry the pavilion was not stronger.† â€Å"But – † she said. â€Å"The – the old magic, before the demesnes were made, the old magic still lives close under the earth there. You know this – you must have felt it too. The pavilion was power to use, for good or ill, without rule.† Another silence, while he looked at his hands. â€Å"I apologise for the violence of my words. I did not – do not – hate my brother. The bitterness I feel is the bitterness of my own frustration – my own lack of power to pull our land together again. Or rather, the power is still there, but it has been turned to, or into, Fire, and I cannot turn it back, however I try.† Savagely he clapped his hands together, and when he opened them, a pillar of fire roared up from between them – he closed them again and the fire disappeared. â€Å"That is only a trick to frighten children, here. Here I cannot be sure, if I reach out to grasp a goblet, that I won’t miss, and grab the air, or burn the hand of her who holds it out to me. It is the same when I reach for the earthlines. I miss, or do harm.† â€Å"You healed the burnt hand of the woman who held the goblet for you. It is not all tricks to frighten children,† she said, hoping he had not seen that she had been frightened just now. â€Å"I hear the earthlines too – I not only must, as Chalice, but by being Chalice I cannot help it – and I have felt no harm done lately.† He raised his eyes and looked at her. â€Å"Would you? Would you feel it? Could you say to yourself, ‘Yes, here is a break – a roughness, a troubling – that was not here a sennight ago’?† She returned his look and refused to look away. â€Å"I don’t know. That is what you are pressing me to say, is it not? I don’t know because I don’t know what the earthlines should feel like, should sound like – what they would feel like if the land were settled and content – whether their constant plaintive murmur would at last fall silent. I don’t know. It is only one of a thousand thousand things I don’t know. But I know the land lies quieter now than it did a year ago – than it did six months ago. I know the earthlines lie softer than they did.† He shifted his gaze away from her, as if looking through the woods to the House and then beyond, across the long leagues of the entire demesne. She sat staring at him, and was so far away in her thoughts that when he looked back at her she did not move her eyes quickly enough. â€Å"What do you see?† he said. How to cite Chalice Chapter 6, Essay examples

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Operation Management Reflection Paper †MyAssignmenthelp.com

Question: Discuss about the Operation Management Reflection Paper. Answer: Institutional Affiliation Management operation: thought process behind an action plan The process of brainstorming on a plan to make kidney dialysis fluid was mainly based on quality, cost, and storage. Questions asked in the action plan sought to answer quality and availability expectations for not only the patients but also the hospitals and dialysis centers, which are target as the market for the product. In my view, the target market was also a consideration since it is important to know how substantial the target market is and if it can support the business once operations begins. This consideration would include hospitals known to have dialysis machines and any specialized knowledge needed in the operation. Common complications arising from dialysis like anemia, low blood pressure and fluid retention were also studied for the possibility of research and development coming up with a fluid concentration causing less related complications(Biernacki Pittsburgh, n.d). We also addressed the availability of delivery schedules with consideration for any necessary pre-dialysis periods by the hospital and to plan production volumes, which would determine required technology and it, cost, a factor, which would be included in the budget to be presented to potential investors(Symons Goldstein, 2011). Production personnel required would help in the knowledge of which steps in the production process could be automated. In addition, we also believed that it would help to approximate the number of employees needed, including the average expected salary, which would form part of the budget. Knowledge of raw materials would influence location of production industry based on the cost and difficulty of their transportation. Because being cost effective is one of the goals in doing business, the cheaper method of storage, which is hiring a warehouse whose maintenance would be the owners responsibility was chosen. I believe this approach would also help in searching for potential suppliers and think of suitable ways to test supplies for quality. Before any production plant is set up, it must adhere to standards set by environmental organizations and follow all set legal procedures by the government. In my opinion, I presume that improving the process would mean to make it much faster and possibly with better results. Automation is a precise, fast, and labor-intensive way of improving the process and can be applied to quality assurance, mixing, and size reduction processes. We gathered our information from medical journals on the dialysis process, optimal composition of the fluid, complications arising from dialysis, and the defined limits of what dialysis can and cannot do. After this research, we discovered that there is room for improvement in this field and that the process is very delicate, requiring precise amounts of its different components. Each individual in the tutorial group was assigned a facet of the report, which they were to analyze in depth. The best primary system definition assumed in our inquiry is that of a system to define chemical inputs to achieve a predicted chemical product, which means that the various components were defined by their specific measurements and used to make the kidney dialysis fluid. However, an alternative definition which would apply is a system to define chemical inputs to improve a predicted chemical product, which in this case meant that as much as production of a dialysis fluid has a standard formula, through research and development we intend to create a similar or better product using different means. Bibliography Biernacki, A., Pittsburgh. (n.d). Kidney care begins with kidney smart. Retrieved March 18, 2018, from Divata Kidney Care. Symons, J. M., Goldstein, S. L. (2011). Pediatric Renal Replacement Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit. In Pediatric Critical Care. Elsevier Inc. Hemodialysis, A. (2006). Clinical practice guidelines for hemodialysis adequacy, update 2006. American journal of kidney diseases: the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, 48, S2. Block, G. A., Raggi, P., Bellasi, A., Kooienga, L., Spiegel, D. M. (2007). Mortality effect of coronary calcification and phosphate binder choice in incident hemodialysis patients. Kidney international, 71(5), 438-441.

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Aging Theories Essays - Molecular Biology, Senescence, Mutation

Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affects every part of the body, many different steps are involved and various types of reactions occur. Changes in DNA take place, which can and often do affect the way the body functions; harmful genes are sometimes activated, and necessary ones deactivated. A decrease in important body proteins like hormones and certain types of body cells is almost inevitable. These, among many, are characteristic changes that take place in our bodies as time moves on and aging continues. At present, a universal explanation for how we age or why we age does not exist, but there are many theories to explain this puzzle, and they are supported by continuous research. In this report, some of the how theories of aging will be examined. Among them are theories concerning spontaneous mutations, damage from free radicals, the clock gene, cellular aging, a weakened immune system, wear and tear, and hormonal and neuroendocrinous changes. Spontaneous Mutations The spontaneous mutations theory, also known as the somatic mutation hypothesis, states that the crucial events that cause aging are mutations. These are changes in a cell=s DNA, which are passed on to daughter cells during mitosis. Since genes on DNA code for specific proteins, mutated genes may produce defective proteins, which do not work properly. Many proteins can be affected, such as enzymes, proteins comprising muscle tissue, and a recently discovered type of protein called transcription factors, which bind to DNA and regulate the individual activities of genes themselves. Physical mutagens are substances that increase the chance of mutation and include such physical phenomena as x-rays and radioactivity from radium. The atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan are examples of physical mutagens that caused an increase in the number of cases of leukemia. Certain chemicals and radiation cause mutations to occur in DNA by giving off high energy particles. These particles collide with the DNA and knock off atoms of the DNA randomly, damaging it. DNA consists of sequences of four possible nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine, paired so that adenine always pairs with thymine, and guanine always pairs with cytosine. As cells repair the damaged DNA, a different DNA base is often substituted. This base-substitution is known as a point mutation and can cause the production of a defective or damaged protein. Apart from being caused by radiation or chemicals, mutations also occur spontaneously but at lower rates. Physicist Leo Szilard and biochemist Denham Harmon proposed that because most mutations are harmful, the more spontaneous mutations that arise, the more abnormalities that arise as defective proteins are produced. These could ultimately kill an individual (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 20). Although it has been proven that many proteins undergo alterations during aging, the spontaneous mutations theory is not the cause (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 21). It has, however, been proven that DNA is chemically altered during aging. Modifications in DNA bases, called I-spots, have been found to increase in number during aging. Besides I-spots, another modified base known as 8-hydroxyguanine, the DNA base guanine with an added OH group, has also been found to increase during aging. It is unclear how changes such as these arise, but similar changes seem to be caused be exposure to mutation-causing chemicals, some of which are found in tobacco smoke (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 21). Another factor supporting the spontaneous mutations theory may lie in the temporal occurrence of genetic mutations. Certain cancers and abnormal growths seem to appear more frequently as the process of aging continues. Two tumour suppressor genes called p16 and p53 are responsible for slowing cell proliferation, and therefore keep certain cells from becoming cancerous. However, if they become mutated, they do not carry out their function properly so cells with these mutations begin to grow and divide quickly, causing cancer and other growths (Ricklefs and Finch, 1995, 22). Werner's syndrome is a disorder that significantly accelerates the aging process starting at

Sunday, March 8, 2020

Free Essays on Isaacs Storm

Some people are just gifted. While researching data on a turn-of-the-century murder, author Erik Larson stumbles upon newspaper accounts of the most lethal natural disaster in American history (Random House, 1999). The discovery leads to his writing of Isaac’s Storm, a national bestseller. The book describes in great detail how a hurricane destroyed the town of Galveston, Texas in 1900. Larson’s interest in history and foul weather phenomenon combined with the intriguing photographic devastation was factors that led to his writing. He was amazed that few people knew of a documented catastrophe with a death toll greater than the combined toll of the Johnstown Flood and San Francisco Earthquake. Although he has no formal weather training his research and self-proclaimed â€Å"forensic investigation† techniques (University of Oregon, 1999) produced an excellent read. From Larson’s childhood background in Freeport, Long Island during the hurricane years of the 1950’s and 1960’s through his major in history at the University of Pennsylvania he seemed to prepare himself for just such a work. His resume also includes graduation from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, teaching nonfiction writing at San Francisco State University, and stints with major papers and periodicals such as the Wall Street Journal, Harpers and Atlantic Monthly. From the opening chapter â€Å" The Beach†, Larson provides enough documentary that you find the book hard to put down. He lays out families, events, days and people in detail that you can follow throughout the book; in some cases you can imagine yourself actually there. The next chapter traces the origin of the hurricane in the next chapter followed by a description of Isaac Cline’s upbringing and weather forecasting background, providing a strong basis for tracking the storm and understanding Cline’s mindset. While important to document the National Weather Service’s mode of operation it... Free Essays on Isaac's Storm Free Essays on Isaac's Storm Some people are just gifted. While researching data on a turn-of-the-century murder, author Erik Larson stumbles upon newspaper accounts of the most lethal natural disaster in American history (Random House, 1999). The discovery leads to his writing of Isaac’s Storm, a national bestseller. The book describes in great detail how a hurricane destroyed the town of Galveston, Texas in 1900. Larson’s interest in history and foul weather phenomenon combined with the intriguing photographic devastation was factors that led to his writing. He was amazed that few people knew of a documented catastrophe with a death toll greater than the combined toll of the Johnstown Flood and San Francisco Earthquake. Although he has no formal weather training his research and self-proclaimed â€Å"forensic investigation† techniques (University of Oregon, 1999) produced an excellent read. From Larson’s childhood background in Freeport, Long Island during the hurricane years of the 1950’s and 1960’s through his major in history at the University of Pennsylvania he seemed to prepare himself for just such a work. His resume also includes graduation from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, teaching nonfiction writing at San Francisco State University, and stints with major papers and periodicals such as the Wall Street Journal, Harpers and Atlantic Monthly. From the opening chapter â€Å" The Beach†, Larson provides enough documentary that you find the book hard to put down. He lays out families, events, days and people in detail that you can follow throughout the book; in some cases you can imagine yourself actually there. The next chapter traces the origin of the hurricane in the next chapter followed by a description of Isaac Cline’s upbringing and weather forecasting background, providing a strong basis for tracking the storm and understanding Cline’s mindset. While important to document the National Weather Service’s mode of operation it...

Thursday, February 20, 2020

A Good Man Must Know One Song by Heart Movie Review

A Good Man Must Know One Song by Heart - Movie Review Example A gripping story set in 1929 about a family of three. The father leaves home for New York to work there along with his friends as members of a band. The band becomes popular at that area, and pay becomes even better. Way back home, the ten-year old son and his mother alternates time among playing piano, strolling around the vicinity, and cooking food. The situation forces the son to look for his father bringing only with him a song that his father taught him years ago.The film's narration played as a flashback starting out promisingly in what is supposed to be an abandoned area in New York, where the son is shown to be cuddling his father while humming a tune. The father was looking aimlessly at nowhere in his tattered suits, while the son looked simple in his pants and jacket. The transition to the next scene was poignant and dramatic because the succeeding scene was beautifully juxtaposed with the previous scene. In the second scene, the father was seen cuddling his son while singi ng the song "While My Baby Lulls in a Hammock." The mother entered the scene, and then all at once, the audience was introduced to all the principal characters of the film. But just when you are expecting things to get even better, as the film tried to give the audience an idea of the setting and the zeitgeist of the story, the film slowed down and devoted too much time to the protagonists' uneventful music sessions. There, the film accommodated half of the total number of songs-there were ten-that were supposed to be played in the entire film. While the film's first half tried your patience, it picked up speed as the focus shifted to where it should be: New York and the specter of the Great Depression. There were two significant events between the period of 1925 and 1935 that were woven into or depicted in the film: 1) The movie's moral crackdown in 1934-Due to the newly-enforced rigorous production code courtesy of Will Hays, the film's dialogues, song lyrics, and the presentation of the visuals were seemingly sanitized. Rumor has it that several lines-including "Mother, do you think is it acceptable for Father if I were to fall in love with someone, but not marry her"-were intentionally omitted during the post-production to suit the taste of the members of the so-called Legion of Decency. As a result of this, the film in its entirety was devoid of any shocking but commercially appealing dialogue and situations. Instead, unnecessary optimism pervaded all throughout in its less than 90-minute run. Such existential optimism was manifested in script like "Do not worry son. Your father will soon find his way to us." 2) The ushering of the Great Depression in 1929-discussions among bankers visiting the club where the father plays centered on the issue of Wall Street's fall. Although, the site of Wall Street was never included in any of the scenes, the actors really talked about blue chips like Standard Oil and Westinghouse, and the plummeting values of the shares of White Sewing Machine with ease that one could have an impression that bankers who were forced to resign from financial institutions were acquired as actors. Commentaries One critic said that there was a visible effort on the part of the filmmakers to show that this film had set the bar high in terms of visuals, sounds, and historical accuracy. Although the visuals, through camerawork, hardly moved to prevent the scratches made by camera from being recorded, the actors' faces registered clearly and properly projected to create an impression of a depressing scenario. The sounds consisted of a few songs of longing and melancholia and crisp and concise audible (and inaudible) dialogue. The claim to historical accurac